Dealing with mental health professionals?

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Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by Admin on Tue May 19, 2015 3:19 pm

Who has dealt with therapists, psychologists, psychiatrists, or other mental health professionals?

To those who did, did the topic of not wanting sex ever come up, and how did they respond to it? Did they accept it, or did they treat it as a problem, and try to convince you it was something that needed to be "fixed"?
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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by SCH0206 on Tue May 19, 2015 4:38 pm

I have never dealt with a mental health professional, but I've read literature on the Web about personality disorders, particularly schizoid personality disorder.  Schizoid behaviors include spending lots of time alone, rarely showing emotion, and not being interested in romantic and sexual relationships.  I mention this "disorder" specifically because I'm on that spectrum.  I find this a bit insulting that I need to be "fixed" just because being a loner is different.  As a child and even as an adult sometimes, I was chided a lot for my loner behavior.  In the sexual aspect of it, I didn't receive as much flak for it since I keep the antisexual part of myself quiet.  But, I find it offensive that I "need" a spouse or partner to be "normal".  Why change myself to appease superficial approval?  I just want to be left alone.

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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by ForeverPure on Tue May 19, 2015 5:49 pm

Psychologists are a massive waste of money and in my experience have no scientific evidence to back themselves up. The worst part is they do not even prescribe medications usually - which makes their expensive sessions even more wasteful. Even the prescribed medications are not even that good - I have been on high dosages of Zoloft and various sedatives to help with my irritable bowel syndrome - all of which have just made me drowsy.

Psychiatrists are very entertaining - you will be convinced that they came right out of 1984 with their complete reliance on social norms in order to diagnose "mental illnesses". Don't like shopping? You have social anxiety disorder. Don't want to be friends with a glutton who practices sodomy? You probably have autism. Feeling tired all the time because you only get five hours of sleep in order to keep your job? You have clinical depression and most likely performance anxiety disorder.

Like come on, what can you expect from a system that thinks it is morally, mentally and physically healthy to gluttonize and commit sodomy? The lowest common denominator is what.

Now therapists in my experience are like between a psychologist and a psychiatrist - all three of them are basically useless.

Never had any of them be concerned about my views concerning sexuality and especially my abstinence towards it. One of them told me that I have a "mental illness" because of my relationship with my father - which is pretty much non-existent. Not sure how disliking your father can be considered a mental illness, but hey, psychiatry creates jobs right? Isn't that what everybody wants these days? Cannot blame them considering the system will allow you to starve if you cannot afford food.

Not to mention, they change their rules all the time. Not too long ago, homosexuals were considered extremely perverse and sick. And now, they practically have more rights than any other "sexual orientation". In fact, in Canada, calling them "mentally sick" now could ironically make you get labelled as "mentally ill" and or even arrested for spreading "hate" speech.

I hate all forms of sexuality, so I guess I am extremely mentally ill. Good thing for the producers of Zoloft, just imagine how much less jobs we would have if people did not have clinical autistic deviant depressive performance socialization disorder. In fact, I'm going to run for Prime Minister with the headline:
"Get sick, create jobs and get the fat gluttons rich."
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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by Biscotti on Tue May 19, 2015 6:40 pm

"All psychology is subjective"
That's what I adopted as an opinion just yesterday in fact. It's short and conveys what I think nicely.

I like certain parts of this video on societally trendy soft sciences https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1jkKfn52UXQ
(Coincidentally he talks about John Kellogg at the beginning who was one of us...sort of)
6:20 if you want to skip that part.
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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by Admin on Wed May 20, 2015 7:11 am

@SCH0206 wrote:I have never dealt with a mental health professional, but I've read literature on the Web about personality disorders, particularly schizoid personality disorder.  Schizoid behaviors include spending lots of time alone, rarely showing emotion, and not being interested in romantic and sexual relationships.  I mention this "disorder" specifically because I'm on that spectrum.  I find this a bit insulting that I need to be "fixed" just because being a loner is different.  As a child and even as an adult sometimes, I was chided a lot for my loner behavior.  In the sexual aspect of it, I didn't receive as much flak for it since I keep the antisexual part of myself quiet.

There's controversy over whether Schizoid Personality Disorder should be considered a disorder or not, and one of the arguments against it is that many schizoid people aren't distressed by their traits, and are perfectly content being alone.

One of the key criterion of whether something should be considered a psychological disorder is that it causes distress to the person. If a trait or combination of traits don't cause distress to the person, nor makes them a danger to oneself or others, it shouldn't be deemed a disorder.

But, I find it offensive that I "need" a spouse or partner to be "normal".  Why change myself to appease superficial approval?  I just want to be left alone.

Absolutely. I hate that idea too, and it's depressing to think how many people did try to change themselves for superficial approval, when they were fine not having a partner.

@ForeverPure wrote:Psychologists are a massive waste of money and in my experience have no scientific evidence to back themselves up. The worst part is they do not even prescribe medications usually - which makes their expensive sessions even more wasteful. Even the prescribed medications are not even that good - I have been on high dosages of Zoloft and various sedatives to help with my irritable bowel syndrome - all of which have just made me drowsy.

Psychiatrists are very entertaining - you will be convinced that they came right out of 1984 with their complete reliance on social norms in order to diagnose "mental illnesses". Don't like shopping? You have social anxiety disorder. Don't want to be friends with a glutton who practices sodomy? You probably have autism. Feeling tired all the time because you only get five hours of sleep in order to keep your job? You have clinical depression and most likely performance anxiety disorder.

Like come on, what can you expect from a system that thinks it is morally, mentally and physically healthy to gluttonize and commit sodomy? The lowest common denominator is what.

Now therapists in my experience are like between a psychologist and a psychiatrist - all three of them are basically useless.

Never had any of them be concerned about my views concerning sexuality and especially my abstinence towards it. One of them told me that I have a "mental illness" because of my relationship with my father - which is pretty much non-existent. Not sure how disliking your father can be considered a mental illness, but hey, psychiatry creates jobs right? Isn't that what everybody wants these days? Cannot blame them considering the system will allow you to starve if you cannot afford food.

Not to mention, they change their rules all the time. Not too long ago, homosexuals were considered extremely perverse and sick. And now, they practically have more rights than any other "sexual orientation". In fact, in Canada, calling them "mentally sick" now could ironically make you get labelled as "mentally ill" and or even arrested for spreading "hate" speech.

I hate all forms of sexuality, so I guess I am extremely mentally ill. Good thing for the producers of Zoloft, just imagine how much less jobs we would have if people did not have clinical autistic deviant depressive performance socialization disorder. In fact, I'm going to run for Prime Minister with the headline:
"Get sick, create jobs and get the fat gluttons rich."

I have a background in psychology and I think the field has gone way too far with trying to diagnose everyone who strays from the narrow and arbitrary idea they claim of what being "normal" is (which apparently means: being extroverted, always wanting to be around people, always happy, and wanting sex and romance).

That's awful that a therapist told you that you're "mentally ill" because of the relationship with your father. What was that therapist's "logic" behind that claim? Probably still adheres to Freudian ideas, even though they've been discredited decades ago.

Not to mention that labeling people who spread hate speech "mentally ill" for it may further stigmatize people who have actual mental illnesses.

@Biscotti wrote:"All psychology is subjective"
That's what I adopted as an opinion just yesterday in fact. It's short and conveys what I think nicely.

I like certain parts of this video on societally trendy soft sciences https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1jkKfn52UXQ
(Coincidentally he talks about John Kellogg at the beginning who was one of us...sort of)
6:20 if you want to skip that part.

I watched through most of that video, and it's off-topic, but the part he mentioned about anthropology reminded me that's another field that is still having to undo the damage that happened to it, because of the early "research" that was done. What he mentioned about the pitfall common to gender studies being using "one size fits all" models that don't fit everyone, do you think psychology is the same way?
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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by Biscotti on Wed May 20, 2015 7:15 pm

@Admin wrote: do you think psychology is the same way?

Sort of. Back to my statement "All psychology is subjective", I should have clarified that by "Subjective" I meant cast through a certain perspective/view on life. I didn't mean "Opinionated".
I guess that sort of crosses over with the "one-size-fits-all" criticism he had.
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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by Admin on Wed May 20, 2015 8:22 pm

@Biscotti wrote:
@Admin wrote: do you think psychology is the same way?

Sort of. Back to my statement "All psychology is subjective", I should have clarified that by "Subjective" I meant cast through a certain perspective/view on life. I didn't mean "Opinionated".
I guess that sort of crosses over with the "one-size-fits-all" criticism he had.

I understand, and I also don't like the "one-size-fits-all" approach, since it's cast through a certain perspective, that pathologizes all that doesn't fit it, and that means not wanting sex is still pathologized a lot.

Sexual Aversion Disorder was removed from the DSM-5, and Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder is defined a lot more specifically. However, the wording used in the DSM-5 could still end up pathologizing people just for not wanting sex. The wording uses "clinically significant distress", which on its own isn't a problem.

The problem is what if someone feels distress over not wanting sex, because of all of the pressure to be sexual, and they see a therapist for help? They may end up being wrongfully diagnosed with a sexual dysfunction instead, when what they needed was affirmation that there's nothing wrong with not wanting sex. I feel like that kind of situation could've easily happened to any of us, if we hadn't found any support. Or, has this happened to any of you before?
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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by Biscotti on Thu May 21, 2015 12:59 pm

I've never doubted in the ugliness of sex but as far as I can remember always have doubted psychologists, therapists and the like.
But for those I guess I would classify as "weaker" that's what the IAM (International Antisexual Movement) is for, to reach those people.
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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by Admin on Fri May 22, 2015 7:00 am

@Biscotti wrote:I've never doubted in the ugliness of sex but as far as I can remember always have doubted psychologists, therapists and the like.
But for those I guess I would classify as "weaker" that's what the IAM (International Antisexual Movement) is for, to reach those people.

Before I knew of the IAM, I still knew that I didn't want sex, nor could I see any good in it, but I experienced a lot of self-doubt from those people who kept pushing sex on me. I still never wanted sex, and I still didn't believe their claims, but I did almost feel like it was hopeless to continue resisting.

If that didn't happen to me, I still would've been happy to find the IAM, because it meant there are others out there who feel the same way. In my case, finding out about the IAM may have saved me from caving into unwanted sex, because I was nearly too beaten down to say no anymore.

I think there are still a lot of people in that kind of situation, and they need to be reached out to. They may know that they don't want sex, but either cave into it, or if not, feel guilty over not having and not wanting sex (and may be at risk of caving in), because they haven't seen anyone affirm that they're not wrong.

Pathologization still happens a lot informally, by "friends" and family who may tell, or even push someone to see a therapist or a psychiatrist to "fix" their dislike for sex.
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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by ForeverPure on Fri May 22, 2015 10:59 am

The Antisex Stronghold now links to a website full of naked females. I agree with some stances from that organization, but I remember reading about an odd essay saying that retaining semen somehow makes you more intelligent by giving you "its nutrients". Although I agree self-stimulation is wrong, I do not think semen is beneficial to anyone.
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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by Admin on Fri May 22, 2015 5:29 pm

@ForeverPure wrote:The Antisex Stronghold now links to a website full of naked females. I agree with some stances from that organization, but I remember reading about an odd essay saying that retaining semen somehow makes you more intelligent by giving you "its nutrients". Although I agree self-stimulation is wrong, I do not think semen is beneficial to anyone.

Sadly, the admin gave up on the site 2 years ago, and may have let the domain expire earlier this year, allegedly he gave up because it wasn't sustainable anymore. Sad Some offshoots of it exist (mainly in Russian) but they're just not the same. I'm trying to rebuild what was lost, as closely as possible, to help keep those ideas alive.

Also allegedly, there were issues with identifying as antisexual in Russian as well; that the issues that carried over in English carried over in Russian, leading to pressure to abandon the antisexual label in favor of alternatives. That pressure became noticeable 3 years ago.

I think I remember that article, and still think that's odd, but agreeing with every viewpoint wasn't required. That viewpoint isn't unheard of though.
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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by Guest on Mon Nov 02, 2015 4:18 am

Interesting topic, and one relevant to my own history unfortunately, as I was once stuffed into a psychiatry for not going to school anymore (Believe me, after what I went through there, you'd have to have masochistic tendencies to keep visiting, but I digress), just generally being different and not being an extreme consumer of new textiles (My teachers actually held meetings with my parent, not about my lack of effort in school, as I used to be one of the best, but to discuss the fact that I had no degenerate friends and "didn't have enough" clothes. Let that slowly sink in. Moving on.)

I think the entire psychiatric industry, and that's what it is, only exists to make money for those working in it, and to indoctrinate people into being well-oiled wheels in the machine. What a surprise, right. I mean, how come excessive consumerism isn't a disorder? How come constantly visiting psychiatrists to get analyzed isn't a disorder? In fact, how come even wanting to analyze any single thing someone does isn't a disorder? Oh, right, because it gives them money.

Also, I'm just generally against taking drugs to fix your problems. What if the drug is suddenly gone, what then? The absolute ideal is always to somehow manage to survive yourself, and only get something external when there's literally no other way, and a lot of options would have to be explored to arrive at that point. Add to that the fact that psychiatric drugs, and most medication in general, most likely wasn't made with your best interests in mind, as that would mean for these people to lose their jobs. The livelihood of a doctor lies somewhere between your health and your death, so they'll try to keep you there.

Luckily, I don't have to deal with psychiatrists and such that much anymore during my adult life, as it is slightly easier to avoid them at that age (since you have basically no rights as a child), but I can bet they would have mentioned my lack of a "life partner" much more often then they already did if that wasn't the case. And believe me, they did. In fact, every single time one of them analyzed me, the question if I had a "boyfriend" always came up sooner or later. Were they hitting on me? What the hell is even wrong with these braindead zombies? Did they ever have a single original thought in their lives, or is every single thing they say quoted out of some mental archive of bullshit they were forced to read in university? Ugh.

So yeah, no positive thoughts about psychiatry will ever come out of me, unless you manage to convince me otherwise, but I doubt it. People with, for example, loneliness need to either work it out themselves, or might need someone to talk to, someone who actually cares, and doesn't just nod their head while occasionally staring pseudo-meaningfully at the ceiling and saying "Yes, but how did that make you FEEL!? Oh, and did you already try out that new medication that I'll get kickbacks f--I MEAN that is really helpful in your, eh...situation?", no matter what you said prior.

@ForeverPure wrote:Not to mention, they change their rules all the time. Not too long ago, homosexuals were considered extremely perverse and sick. And now, they practically have more rights than any other "sexual orientation". In fact, in Canada, calling them "mentally sick" now could ironically make you get labelled as "mentally ill" and or even arrested for spreading "hate" speech.

Yes, true. Everything that can become an industry is accepted, pretty much. Like transsexualism. Money can be made out of the operations, so it's accepted. Money must be made out of this somehow, otherwise it wouldn't be accepted. Well, time is money as they say, maybe these people simply became so many that it would've cost more time to convince them otherwise. Oh well, I'm against all kinds of sexual behavior, so whatever...

Also, I agree with what you said. Too bad you were on antidepressants, I'm very weary of these things, never took them and never will, unless I'm forced. Which might even happen someday, considering my past and how sick this world is. Who knows what they're doing to one's brain.

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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by Admin on Mon Nov 02, 2015 6:39 am

@Stars.of.Tears wrote:Interesting topic, and one relevant to my own history unfortunately, as I was once stuffed into a psychiatry for not going to school anymore (Believe me, after what I went through there, you'd have to have masochistic tendencies to keep visiting, but I digress), just generally being different and not being an extreme consumer of new textiles (My teachers actually held meetings with my parent, not about my lack of effort in school, as I used to be one of the best, but to discuss the fact that I had no degenerate friends and "didn't have enough" clothes. Let that slowly sink in. Moving on.)

I think the entire psychiatric industry, and that's what it is, only exists to make money for those working in it, and to indoctrinate people into being well-oiled wheels in the machine. What a surprise, right. I mean, how come excessive consumerism isn't a disorder? How come constantly visiting psychiatrists to get analyzed isn't a disorder? In fact, how come even wanting to analyze any single thing someone does isn't a disorder? Oh, right, because it gives them money.

That's awful that you went through all of that, yet you were blamed for not wanting to conform to consumerism, instead of your peers rightfully being blamed for being bullies. It's sickening. Your teachers' priorities were completely messed up; why did they care about consumerism over whether all of their students are getting a proper education and felt safe to learn in school?

In my first few years of school, I had teachers who wanted me put on medication just so I could be more "convenient" to them, although my parents had to challenge the school system for my right to not have unneeded medication forced on me. My offense? Being bored in school. I liked learning a lot, but I didn't like school and how it was structured.


Also, I'm just generally against taking drugs to fix your problems. What if the drug is suddenly gone, what then? The absolute ideal is always to somehow manage to survive yourself, and only get something external when there's literally no other way, and a lot of options would have to be explored to arrive at that point. Add to that the fact that psychiatric drugs, and most medication in general, most likely wasn't made with your best interests in mind, as that would mean for these people to lose their jobs. The livelihood of a doctor lies somewhere between your health and your death, so they'll try to keep you there.

I also believe that medication should be used only as a last resort, after other options have been tried. For some people, medication is the only thing that will work, but it's sickening to know that some psychiatrists will push medication on their patients as the first option, not the last.


Luckily, I don't have to deal with psychiatrists and such that much anymore during my adult life, as it is slightly easier to avoid them at that age (since you have basically no rights as a child), but I can bet they would have mentioned my lack of a "life partner" much more often then they already did if that wasn't the case. And believe me, they did. In fact, every single time one of them analyzed me, the question if I had a "boyfriend" always came up sooner or later. Were they hitting on me? What the hell is even wrong with these braindead zombies? Did they ever have a single original thought in their lives, or is every single thing they say quoted out of some mental archive of bullshit they were forced to read in university? Ugh.

So yeah, no positive thoughts about psychiatry will ever come out of me, unless you manage to convince me otherwise, but I doubt it. People with, for example, loneliness need to either work it out themselves, or might need someone to talk to, someone who actually cares, and doesn't just nod their head while occasionally staring pseudo-meaningfully at the ceiling and saying "Yes, but how did that make you FEEL!? Oh, and did you already try out that new medication that I'll get kickbacks f--I MEAN that is really helpful in your, eh...situation?", no matter what you said prior.

Why did they think it was their business whether you had a boyfriend or not? Did they also try to change you because of it? They probably thought there was "one true path" (desiring a romantic partner, having one, wanting to get married and have children, etc.), and fitting the set role in it, that they thought whoever strayed must have something wrong with them, but they might see nothing wrong with someone forcing themselves into that role when they know they don't want it and it makes them miserable?

I've taken several psychology classes, and they've emphasized that there isn't a one-size-fits all solution, that many ideas of "normal" or "healthy" are arbitrary, and that patients should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis while avoiding harm to them, but that's still probably the exception and not the rule.

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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by Biscotti on Tue Nov 03, 2015 2:41 am

@Admin wrote: although my parents had to challenge the school system for my right to not have unneeded medication forced on me. My offense? Being bored in school. I liked learning a lot, but I didn't like school and how it was structured.

Where the heck country do you live? This sounds like some dystopian stuff.

I would never use medication for mind-problems. I consider it weak-minded however maybe I'm just priviliged to have such a well-adjusted mind. (Not aiming to be offensive to anyone, these are my thoughts concerning myself.)

About psychiatry and stars.of.tears, the experiences that you wrote about make it seem as if your psychiatrists are even worse then the usual psychiatrists. 
I believe that all or most of psychology is subjective. Personally to me, the most positive thing I can say about psychology is that if someone subscribes to a psychology theory, and it helps them. Then there that's a positive thing. Though I've heard people also join Scientology because it helps them.
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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by SCH0206 on Tue Nov 03, 2015 10:56 am

"..although my parents had to challenge the school system for my right to not have unneeded medication forced on me. My offense? Being bored in school. I liked learning a lot, but I didn't like school and how it was structured."

If your parents knew about you being bored in school, why did they send you there in the first place? Was it possible for you to be home-schooled?

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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by Admin on Tue Nov 03, 2015 5:01 pm

@Biscotti wrote:
@Admin wrote: although my parents had to challenge the school system for my right to not have unneeded medication forced on me. My offense? Being bored in school. I liked learning a lot, but I didn't like school and how it was structured.

Where the heck country do you live? This sounds like some dystopian stuff.

I would never use medication for mind-problems. I consider it weak-minded however maybe I'm just priviliged to have such a well-adjusted mind. (Not aiming to be offensive to anyone, these are my thoughts concerning myself.)

About psychiatry and stars.of.tears, the experiences that you wrote about make it seem as if your psychiatrists are even worse then the usual psychiatrists.
I believe that all or most of psychology is subjective. Personally to me, the most positive thing I can say about psychology is that if someone subscribes to a psychology theory, and it helps them. Then there that's a positive thing. Though I've heard people also join Scientology because it helps them.

The school system didn't, and still doesn't have the power to diagnose students or prescribe medication for them. Yet, multiple teachers at that school tried to push for diagnosing me and getting me on medication anyways, all because it'd be more convenient for them.

@SCH0206 wrote:"..although my parents had to challenge the school system for my right to not have unneeded medication forced on me. My offense? Being bored in school. I liked learning a lot, but I didn't like school and how it was structured."

If your parents knew about you being bored in school, why did they send you there in the first place? Was it possible for you to be home-schooled?

Homeschooling wasn't an option for me. I just had to deal with those bad teachers in the mean time, but I had some much better teachers at that school later.
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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by Guest on Wed Nov 04, 2015 4:10 am

@Admin wrote:That's awful that you went through all of that, yet you were blamed for not wanting to conform to consumerism, instead of your peers rightfully being blamed for being bullies. It's sickening. Your teachers' priorities were completely messed up; why did they care about consumerism over whether all of their students are getting a proper education and felt safe to learn in school?

Right. I was even put into a socialization course, where I should learn how to behave right (...lol? I literally don't know what else to say to that.), and where only bullies and people who disturbed the class and such were put. Not my bullies though. One of my teachers was pretty fond of my bullies, maybe that's why. My only crime the entire time being, of course, being good in school, having "simple-looking" (I'd call it practical, but they certainly don't like practicality, as has become pretty obvious) attire, and keeping entirely to myself.

I live in a rather small city/town in Germany, so homeschooling was never an option, as it's not legal here. Just mentioning that, because I have no idea how this is like in other countries. But something makes me doubt people elsewhere are all that different deep down.

In my first few years of school, I had teachers who wanted me put on medication just so I could be more "convenient" to them, although my parents had to challenge the school system for my right to not have unneeded medication forced on me. My offense? Being bored in school. I liked learning a lot, but I didn't like school and how it was structured.

That's disgusting, they never tried that with me luckily. In school anyway. Did they actually do it? I hope not. And being bored in school is no wonder, considering what they teach there. The entire school system needs to change anyway. It needs to have its focus in helping people to think for themselves, and be critical of everything, as that's how science itself works. But school doesn't educate people to be scientists and artists and so on after all, but office and assembly line workers and such who follow orders no matter how stupid and never open their mouths wider than is required to breathe and nod, so everyone who doesn't obey...ugh. Oh well, not going to rant about that now, it'd be too long.

Why did they think it was their business whether you had a boyfriend or not? Did they also try to change you because of it? They probably thought there was "one true path" (desiring a romantic partner, having one, wanting to get married and have children, etc.), and fitting the set role in it, that they thought whoever strayed must have something wrong with them, but they might see nothing wrong with someone forcing themselves into that role when they know they don't want it and it makes them miserable?

Well, in my case, I think it's because I grew up with my father, and since in this sexually charged society people are raised to believe all men are beasts in a cage just waiting to pounce and rape, I was always suspected to have been raped, because I was very quiet and withdrawn in school (because I never wanted to have anything to do with these people, but who cares about what I think) which must of course have meant that and nothing but that, because every case ever is the exact same. It was never officially said that that's what they suspected (Maybe because I could've sued them for that, very clever), but it couldn't have been more obvious. Oh well, I don't really care anymore, but that was probably also one of the reasons why I am constantly asked everytime I have to face one one these psychologists, which I do occasionally in my current situation. If I ever told them about my rejection of sex, they'd probably see it as another "proof" than I was raped, so for my own sake I'd better keep quiet about that to these kinds of people. If one doesn't want to understand anything but their own viewpoint, they never will. To a hammer, every problem looks like a nail? Or something like that.

But anyway, no, they never wanted me to change my lifestyle, or at least never directly told me, but they always had this disgusting look of utter pity in their faces when I answered in the negative. A sentiment I share for them, but unlike them I at least have the decency to not obviously show it on my face. Or the facial muscle control.

I've taken several psychology classes, and they've emphasized that there isn't a one-size-fits all solution, that many ideas of "normal" or "healthy" are arbitrary, and that patients should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis while avoiding harm to them, but that's still probably the exception and not the rule.

Yes, I took some online courses in psychology as well, but they never kept my interest long enough to pursue further. But this does seem to be the case. I'm not opposed to wanting to understand how our mind works, I actually think it's useful. If only they'd actually practice what they preach. I'm just against the industry this has spawned, that cares more about self-righteousness and profits than people.

@Biscotti wrote:Where the heck country do you live? This sounds like some dystopian stuff.

Not to answer for the admin, but I think this might apply to me as well. You'd be surprised how normal this is and always has been, all over the world. Centuries ago it might not have been called "psychiatry", but just wanting to shut people up is as old as speaking.

And I agree with you about psychological analysis as it's used today being mostly subjective (as it doesn't actually aim to understand the human mind, but to profit from "fixing defects" of the mind. And if a defect can't be found, one is artificially created), but of course it depends on what exactly we're talking about. In my opinion, people should only be psychologically helped if they themselves wish to be helped. People with helper-syndrome, that even go as far as forcing people against their will to do what's "best for them" are what make this entire thing so disgusting, and only serve to make everything so much worse. But hey, at least drugs and unnecessary "therapy" make money.

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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by SCH0206 on Wed Nov 04, 2015 10:33 am

"I live in a rather small city/town in Germany, so homeschooling was never an option, as it's not legal here. Just mentioning that, because I have no idea how this is like in other countries. But something makes me doubt people elsewhere are all that different deep down."

I've heard about a family from Germany who got in trouble with the law there just for homeschooling, and they sought asylum in the United States.

I'm not sure about too many other countries, but where I am (the US) it's legal, and I think it's the same for Canada, too. However, it's still kind of controversial, and there's a bunch of silly misconceptions that surround it, such as being naive about the world and being dumb. I have a homeschooled friend in Iowa, and she's not stupid or socially inept. She does seem a bit sheltered since I'm familiar with certain things she isn't, but it's not like her parents didn't let her out of the house. I envy her because she's emotionally healthier than I am, and I think homeschooling is partly responsible for that.

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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by Biscotti on Wed Nov 04, 2015 1:00 pm

I was homeschooled for many of my 12 years. And went to a couple different private schools/homeschooling groups for the parts that weren't included in that 'many'.
As a kid I always detested the thought of public school but once I got older, I stopped voicing those opinions because I figured that not everyone had the opportunity to be homeschooled even if they wanted to.
It was pretty nice though.
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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by SCH0206 on Wed Nov 04, 2015 2:58 pm

@Biscotti wrote:I was homeschooled for many of my 12 years. And went to a couple different private schools/homeschooling groups for the parts that weren't included in that 'many'.
As a kid I always detested the thought of public school but once I got older, I stopped voicing those opinions because I figured that not everyone had the opportunity to be homeschooled even if they wanted to.
It was pretty nice though.

I'm one of those people, but it was tough to do that since I grew up in a single-parent, low-income family. I do have an idea how it could've worked, though. Since I was a latchkey kid, I could have taken the bus to the library and read to my heart's content. A drawback to that idea is that I may be bombarded with questions like "Why aren't you in school? "Where are your parents?" Plus, my mother would've never agreed to that. My family is so pro-school it's ridiculous. I got a lot of flak from them when I dropped out of college six years ago, but I refuse to waste anymore time and money learning things in an institution that I can learn on my own for free with library books and the Internet.

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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by Admin on Wed Nov 04, 2015 5:30 pm

Homeschooling is legal in the US, but there is a lot of controversy surrounding the existence of homeschooling, and how much or how little regulation there should be surrounding it. It can work well for some people, in an area with some regulation, and the parents have a good curriculum to teach their children in a way that suits their needs.

On the other hand, some homeschool proponents in the US want to get rid of all regulations, which is terrifying, because some abusive parents use homeschooling in unregulated areas for the purpose of isolating their children and indoctrinating them with only the things that they approve of, and because teachers are mandatory reporters for abuse.
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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by SCH0206 on Wed Nov 04, 2015 5:35 pm

@Admin wrote:Homeschooling is legal in the US, but there is a lot of controversy surrounding the existence of homeschooling, and how much or how little regulation there should be surrounding it. It can work well for some people, in an area with some regulation, and the parents have a good curriculum to teach their children in a way that suits their needs.

On the other hand, some homeschool proponents in the US want to get rid of all regulations, which is terrifying, because some abusive parents use homeschooling in unregulated areas for the purpose of isolating their children and indoctrinating them with only the things that they approve of, and because teachers are mandatory reporters for abuse.

That doesn't just happen in homeschooling environments. I was indoctrinated with narrow-minded viewpoints, and I went to private and public schools. And, it wasn't easy for teachers to spot because I kept quiet about it.

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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by Admin on Wed Nov 04, 2015 6:09 pm

@SCH0206 wrote:
@Admin wrote:Homeschooling is legal in the US, but there is a lot of controversy surrounding the existence of homeschooling, and how much or how little regulation there should be surrounding it. It can work well for some people, in an area with some regulation, and the parents have a good curriculum to teach their children in a way that suits their needs.

On the other hand, some homeschool proponents in the US want to get rid of all regulations, which is terrifying, because some abusive parents use homeschooling in unregulated areas for the purpose of isolating their children and indoctrinating them with only the things that they approve of, and because teachers are mandatory reporters for abuse.

That doesn't just happen in homeschooling environments. I was indoctrinated with narrow-minded viewpoints, and I went to private and public schools. And, it wasn't easy for teachers to spot because I kept quiet about it.

Sorry, I didn't mean to imply that it only could happen in homeschool environments. Teachers are supposed to spot those issues, but abusive parents can still prevent them from being detected (i.e: silencing tactics, appearing as the "perfect parent" in public), and some bad teachers knowingly look the other way and are enablers.
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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by SCH0206 on Wed Nov 04, 2015 6:33 pm

"Sorry, I didn't mean to imply that it only could happen in homeschool environments. Teachers are supposed to spot those issues, but abusive parents can still prevent them from being detected (i.e: silencing tactics, appearing as the "perfect parent" in public), and some bad teachers knowingly look the other way and are enablers."

That's okay. It's sickening how abusive parents would do anything to hide their true colors, including taking advantage of homeschooling. It's also sickening when there are other adults who are supposed to care for children protect the abusers instead.

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Re: Dealing with mental health professionals?

Post by Aztec12 on Sun Apr 24, 2016 7:41 pm

i dont think shrinks are too bad in theory. They help your stress, lose of reality , suidical tendencies and functionality in society and the patients get a better coping mechanics to use or a way to blend in soceity. However I do knows this is not the case most doctors this days think it's all about curing a person and reaping out their personlity (like good old days with lobotomys turning 22  year olds into 2 year olds). This is mind I never had to deal with psychologist in my sexuality, but I sometimes think of what if I did. Then I realizes theory's are not the actual deal.


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